Knowledge management

Gelertner on KM

There's a very good interview with David Gelertner in CIO Insight, in which Gelertner talks about what knowledge management means in terms of computing experiences.

JASIST KM Issue

The TOC for the special Knowledge Management issue of JASIST (JASIST Vol. 53 No. 12) is available.

Knowledge Management: When Bad Things Happen to Good Ideas

Darwin Magazine is running a story on how a good idea –knowledge management– is dragged down by its execution (poor software, poor implementation). A good read to see how your hard work could be totally hijacked by (and is currently getting a bad rep from) a number of peripheral circumstances.

[The address from the link from above: http://www.darwinmag.com/read/040101/badthings_content.html]

KM on a budget

(Is KM an allowed topic here?)

Knowledge management has been knocked around in my organization for so long with so little understanding of what KM is. On the one hand, there is the belief that everything that transpires in your business is an archivable knowledge asset -- hard copy ephemera such as scribbles on paper napkins or meeting leave-behinds; verbal ephemera such as telephone conversations, chats with colleagues at conferences or at dinners; electronic documents such as email and binary files. In reality, I haven't seen the promise of a tool that allows you to capture all this transferable knowledge and then share it easily, but have heard the promises from vendors over the last 5 years. As the term recedes from everyday parlance in large right-sizing organizations such as my own, the need for knowledge management is still pressing. Which brings me to the The 99 cent KM solution, David Weinberger's short essay on KM World that proposes that low-budget tools such as email list applications and weblogs will get you far.

I'm tending to agree that these tools may be sufficient for a lot of small organizations. My understanding is that Knowledge Management is about being able to communicate store and retrieve knowledge. KM is tool and technology agnostic. In these tight-budget days, I still hear the term kicked around a lot, but I hear less and less about initiatives to research a technology to support KM. I don't know that the low budget tools are sufficient to support KM for large organizations, but they certainly seem like sufficient for creating some knowledge sharing until the killer KM app arrives, no?

Taxonomies: An Eye for the Needle

In Intelligent Enterprise, an article on business taxonomies.

Knowledge workers want content management applications to impose order on document chaos. The order imposed must model the business domain they work in. They see the taxonomy of a corporate portal as the key mechanism for managing content according to domain-relevant topics. The taxonomy — a structure for categorizing text content by topic — is the piece of the content management application that knowledge workers depend on most and, therefore, the piece they use for measuring its success.

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